Another account that contains similarities to the last account was recorded more then 150 years later. This one is very interesting.

Admiral Chambers on board the Montague, 4 November 1749, was taking an observation just before noon…he observed a large ball of blue fire about three miles distant from them. They immediately lowered their topsails, but it came up so fast upon them, that, before they could raise the main tack, they observed the ball rise almost perpendicularly, and not above forty or fifty yards from the main chains when it went off with an explosion, as great as if a hundred cannons had been discharged at the same time, leaving behind it a strong sulphurous smell. By this explosion the main top-mast was shattered into pieces and the main mast went down to the keel. Five men were knocked down and one of them much bruised. Just before the explosion, the ball seemed to be the size of a large mill-stone. 1

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Sources:

1 Norton, Andrews, ed. (1813). The General Repository and Review. Vol 3. Cambridge, Massachusetts: William Hilliard. p. 157. Retrieved 10 May 2010.